Do Pacman Frogs Make Noise? Are They Noisy?

This page might contain affiliate links, which will earn us a commission. As an Amazon Associate we earn from qualifying purchases.

Pacman frogs have most likely been of the most popular types of pet frogs for a while now. These amazingly colored frogs have an inevitable resemblance to PacMan, with their round-like shape and large mouths. They are simple to maintain and funny to observe. But do Pacman frogs make noise?

In general, pacman frogs make noises, as most frog species do. Pacman frogs can make a various range of different noises, from croaking and screaming, to chirping and grunting, as well as squeaking.

x
Why are Hamsters so Cute?

This does not seem to happen that frequently but, when it does, one can almost feel as teleported to a jungle area by listening them. How amazing is that?

Why Do Pacman Frogs Croak?

When hearing male Pacman frogs croaking in their natural habitats, it probably means that they are either calling their female friends for mating, or they are startling attackers.

On the other side, Pacman frogs do croak in captivity too, but less frequently. Most of the time, they will croak during mating season, as such sounds are primarily intended to attract female frogs.

Additionally, croaking sounds can be heard for several other reasons. Male frogs will tend to croak while their enclosure is being misted, but also when feeding. On top of these reasons, croaking sounds can be made as a response to other louder noises around their enclosures, including dog barking.

How Loud Are Pacman Frogs?

Frogs can sometimes be pretty loud, especially in their natural habitats. When held as pets, they do however tend to be less loud, but also to produce any kind of noises less frequently.

This does not guarantee that some owners will not be bothered at all by frog sounds. Croaking can be quite high-pitched, and your close neighbors could sometimes hear your pet frogs, too.

Additionally, frogs are not able to localize sounds precisely, as their ear holes are too close to each other. That is one of the reasons why they make such high-pitched sounds in the first place: they simply cannot hear low-pitched and short calls.

If you own a single frog, it most likely will not be producing noises loud enough to disturb anyone that much. A single frog will not be sensing other frogs around your home, which means that they will automatically have less reasons to call out for others (or to warn them). And, obviously, two frogs will double the noise.

If you decide to provide a home for more than one, keeping your little Pacman frogs inside your bedroom is probably not such a good idea, as most of their sounds are emitted during nighttime.

Do Female Pacman Frogs Make Noise?

Even if it is common to think that female Pacman frogs do not produce any noise, this is only partially true. More false than true, to be honest.

Female frogs, in general, do tend to be quieter, if compared to male frogs. They never croak, as female Pacman frogs do not call their male friends for mating.

However, they will scream, grunt and chirp. Female frogs can generally chirp louder than male frogs, as they tend to be larger. Their size allows them to take more oxygen in and, consequentially, to chirp both louder and faster.

Most of the time, owners will hear their lady Pacmans producing sounds while being fed or touched. Not because they are happy, but for the exactly opposite reason: female frogs scream when feeling scared and frightened.

Do Pacman Frogs Make Noise When Dying?

Pacman frogs can make noises when they are seriously distressed, scared, or angry. So, it is possible to hear softer noises from a dying frog, unfortunately. This is their best way of signalizing they do not feel well.

How to Stop Your Pacman Frog from Making Noise?

Frogs are one of those pets that cannot really be trained, but they are to be left alone instead.

If you want to stop your Pacman from making noise, you should start with providing it a safe and peaceful environment. As already explained above, frogs make noise not only when calling out for their potential partners, but also when feeling distressed.

This includes hearing other loud noises, being touched or their enclosures being cleaned. So, the best way to stop them making noises is by helping them feeling calm and safe.

To begin, try finding an appropriate place for their enclosure. Ideally, such area should be away from windows (both to avoid noises from outside but also to avoid too much direct sunlight).

Additionally, try avoiding placing their enclosures near televisions, speakers, or whatever could produce unwanted noises. On top of that, always make sure your pet has enough clean water, proper food and the appropriate humidity and temperature rates.

On top of that, please hold your pet frog as less frequently as possible. They not only feel discomfort when being held, but it can also damage their skin, as it is super delicate.

All the above should help your Pacman frog to make less noise. However, you can not entirely make them stop producing noises.

Male frogs have to call for their female partners when it is mating season, and nobody can stop them from doing so. It is natural for frogs to make noises every now and then, same as dogs need to bark every now and then.

If you simply cannot stand the sound of your frogs, then maybe they are not the ideal type of pet for you, after all.

Wrapping Up

Pacman frogs are surely one of the most colorful pets one can ever own. They look amazing and, on top of that, they are super fun to observe. Even more, Pacman frogs do make noise, and most owners find that amusing.

They make noise when calling out for mating, when feeling distressed or scared, or when they are simply missing something. Perfectly normal and entirely natural.

If you own a pet frog and you want to stop such sounds, you can follow our guidance steps to decrease their noise, but you can never make them become completely quiet. And you should not, right?

Amphibians, Pacman Frogs

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *